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Generalist concern with specialties in post-War automobilia, vernacular photography, and the Midwest. A few items presented here, though most material offered via periodic e-lists and catalogs sent directly to our email list.

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  • [Jamaican Coconut Producers Association Marketing Photograph Album]

[Jamaican Coconut Producers Association Marketing Photograph Album]

450.00
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[Jamaican Coconut Producers Association Marketing Photograph Album]

450.00

A stark assembly of culinary photography and remarkable tropical survivor: A circa-1930's era album of 10 promotional photos of the Jamaican variety of coconut palm, its fruit, and cultivation. Produced by the short-lived Jamaica Cocoaunt Producers Association, a cooperative extant from about 1930 to likely about 1940. From an academic article written by a Basil O. Been and appearing in a 1995 Springer text:

"Coconut palms were well established in Jamaica by the end of the 17th century but did not become an important plantation crop until the 19th century. In the late 1920s and early 1930s, Jamaica's coconut industry was chaotic and depressed. Most of the crop was exported as fresh, dry coconuts, and some copra and oil were being produced by independent operators. In response to this situation, the Jamaica Coconut Producers Association was formed as a marketing organisation in 1930. It used members' coconuts to initially produce copra and oil, and later soaps. Legislation was enacted by the Government to protect the local industry from external competition. In 1940, all small producing factories were amalgamated into one company known as Soap and Edible Products Limited (SEPROD). "

(Been B.O. (1995) The Coconut Industry Board of Jamaica. In: Oropeza C., Howard F.W., Ashburner G.R. (eds) Lethal Yellowing: Research and Practical Aspects. Developments in Plant Pathology, vol 5. Springer, Dordrecht)

Today SEPROD is the largest food company in the English speaking Carribean with more than $20 billion (JMD) in annual sales. Thus, this album stands as a scarce and beautiful primary photographic item from the nexus of the modern Jamaican food industry. 

[Photography] : [Culinary] : [Carribean-Interest] . [Jamaican Coconut Producers Association Photograph Album]. Kingston, Jamaica: Jamaica Cocoanut Producers Association Ltd., [ca. 1930's]. Oblong Folio. 11 thin card leaves, each approximately 16" x 11" and bound through punch holes at left margin with a tied length of braided, green string. 10 of the 11 leaves each with a single, approximately 10" x 7" black and white silver print photograph mounted to rectos only, along with a smaller photographic description card. Final leaf blank., serving as rear wrapper. Photographs numbered 2-11 with #1 perished, presumably along with a front wrapper panel. First leaf detached from string. Some occasional paper loss from leaf edges, mild dampstaning at outer margins. Rear wrap with some substantial paper loss from upper end. Prints remain neat and well preserved, album itself with some inherent, fragile construction issues. Overall, still very good.

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A stark assembly of culinary photography and remarkable tropical survivor: A circa-1930's era album of 10 promotional photos of the Jamaican variety of coconut palm, its fruit, and cultivation. Produced by the short-lived Jamaica Cocoaunt Producers Association, a cooperative extant from about 1930 to likely about 1940. From an academic article written by a Basil O. Been and appearing in a 1995 Springer text:

"Coconut palms were well established in Jamaica by the end of the 17th century but did not become an important plantation crop until the 19th century. In the late 1920s and early 1930s, Jamaica's coconut industry was chaotic and depressed. Most of the crop was exported as fresh, dry coconuts, and some copra and oil were being produced by independent operators. In response to this situation, the Jamaica Coconut Producers Association was formed as a marketing organisation in 1930. It used members' coconuts to initially produce copra and oil, and later soaps. Legislation was enacted by the Government to protect the local industry from external competition. In 1940, all small producing factories were amalgamated into one company known as Soap and Edible Products Limited (SEPROD). "

(Been B.O. (1995) The Coconut Industry Board of Jamaica. In: Oropeza C., Howard F.W., Ashburner G.R. (eds) Lethal Yellowing: Research and Practical Aspects. Developments in Plant Pathology, vol 5. Springer, Dordrecht)

Today SEPROD is the largest food company in the English speaking Carribean with more than $20 billion (JMD) in annual sales. Thus, this album stands as a scarce and beautiful primary photographic item from the nexus of the modern Jamaican food industry. 

[Photography] : [Culinary] : [Carribean-Interest] . [Jamaican Coconut Producers Association Photograph Album]. Kingston, Jamaica: Jamaica Cocoanut Producers Association Ltd., [ca. 1930's]. Oblong Folio. 11 thin card leaves, each approximately 16" x 11" and bound through punch holes at left margin with a tied length of braided, green string. 10 of the 11 leaves each with a single, approximately 10" x 7" black and white silver print photograph mounted to rectos only, along with a smaller photographic description card. Final leaf blank., serving as rear wrapper. Photographs numbered 2-11 with #1 perished, presumably along with a front wrapper panel. First leaf detached from string. Some occasional paper loss from leaf edges, mild dampstaning at outer margins. Rear wrap with some substantial paper loss from upper end. Prints remain neat and well preserved, album itself with some inherent, fragile construction issues. Overall, still very good.